Deep romanticism in pure realism..
edwardhopperuniverse:

Night on the El train

Deep romanticism in pure realism..

edwardhopperuniverse:

Night on the El train

Reblogged from Edward Hopper

We found really interesting philosophy in Federica Bordoni’s illustrations today…

urhajos:

Federica Bordoni

Reblogged from david is going to die
Nothing will ruin your 20’s more than thinking you should have your life together already.
— Quote of the day? (via teawithghosts)
Reblogged from Split Down The Centre
Tags: daily quote
Brillian! damienhirstworld:

Loving in a World of Desire, 1996
by Damien Hirst

Brillian! damienhirstworld:

Loving in a World of Desire, 1996

by Damien Hirst

Reblogged from Damien Hirst's World
artnet:

Matisse at Tate Modern
“An artist should never be a prisoner of himself, a prisoner of style, a prisoner of a reputation, a prisoner of success,” wrote Henri Matisse in his book Jazz (1947). It was with this book that the French painter, then already in his seventies, radically challenged his own practice. 

artnet:

Matisse at Tate Modern

“An artist should never be a prisoner of himself, a prisoner of style, a prisoner of a reputation, a prisoner of success,” wrote Henri Matisse in his book Jazz (1947). It was with this book that the French painter, then already in his seventies, radically challenged his own practice

Reblogged from artnet
lostateminor:

>
These beautiful scenic art pieces are actually painted with credit cards

Artist Sandy Byers from Washington owns a vast collection of credit cards, but they are not used for charging up purchases. Instead, she uses them as a handy replacement for paintbrushes when she doesn’t have any. This method of painting began by accident, when she was about to start painting outdoors after hiking for about a mile with her husband, and realized she had forgotten to bring along her paintbrushes.
She recalled, ‘So I looked around and I just took out my credit card and started painting with it. You gotta find something to paint with when the scene is there and you’ve done the work to get that far’. Her impromptu, off-the-cuff technique worked so well she entered the painting she’d completed on that faithful day in the inaugural Paint the Peninsula competition, and she took home the Juror’s Award! Sandy hasn’t looked back since.
She happily chucked her paintbrushes and her finished pieces thereafter are so breathtaking, it’s kinda hard to tell that they take VISA.

lostateminor:

>

These beautiful scenic art pieces are actually painted with credit cards

image

Artist Sandy Byers from Washington owns a vast collection of credit cards, but they are not used for charging up purchases. Instead, she uses them as a handy replacement for paintbrushes when she doesn’t have any. This method of painting began by accident, when she was about to start painting outdoors after hiking for about a mile with her husband, and realized she had forgotten to bring along her paintbrushes.

She recalled, ‘So I looked around and I just took out my credit card and started painting with it. You gotta find something to paint with when the scene is there and you’ve done the work to get that far’. Her impromptu, off-the-cuff technique worked so well she entered the painting she’d completed on that faithful day in the inaugural Paint the Peninsula competition, and she took home the Juror’s Award! Sandy hasn’t looked back since.

She happily chucked her paintbrushes and her finished pieces thereafter are so breathtaking, it’s kinda hard to tell that they take VISA.

Reblogged from Lost At E Minor
We are thrilled to have this piece in our collection! David Lynch Untitled (Ant in House) | Make sure to read an article about the master http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/31/arts/design/museum-show-for-david-lynch-who-began-as-a-visual-artist.html?ref=arts

We are thrilled to have this piece in our collection! David Lynch Untitled (Ant in House) | Make sure to read an article about the master http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/31/arts/design/museum-show-for-david-lynch-who-began-as-a-visual-artist.html?ref=arts